Went to a wee local tournament this past weekend.  Total line of 21 archers, and I was the only female compounder, which mean that I won two gold medals (luckily for me they gave out medals in uncontested divisions!).

Saturday was a Burton.  My first, so automatic PB.  Windy, though, and I did struggle to pull through sometimes, because I’m pretty sure I was really, really tense trying to fight the wind.  I sorted out a better approach so things perked up a bit coming into the last third of the shoot.  But I’m starting to think my straight front arm isn’t doing me any favours.  I switched because I was getting variable right and lefts depending how much of a push I was doing, and the straight arm sorted that out.  I may try going back to a more relaxed bow arm.

Sunday, Canadian 900.  Calm and HOT.  Probably not hot for you continental Americans or Aussies, but hot for me.  I was hoping to crack 800 but was quietly happy getting this close.   

Breakdown:

55m: 254 (PB 267)

45m: 265 (PB 278) 

35m: 276 (PB 284)

Must do: sort out clicks right/left and ticks up/down required to move a full colour on the target face at each distance!

Casualties:

  • two fletchings gone (one speared by the guy next to me)
  • two points left in the target
  • one nock obliterated and pin severely dented, this time by me

The club used pinex targets (ew) made up of strips of PAINTED pinex (double ew) stacked horizontally.  So if your arrow slipped in between two strips it basically got concreted in with melted paint.  There wasn’t enough silicon spray in the world ….

Back to beautiful danage in about 5 days when I get back home :)

archeree:

Right now I’m having a discussion with someone on a forum who’s arguing that girls’ tendency to “hold back” in sports and in things like PE in High School is due to evolution, because boys have testosterone and have evolved to be stupid and aggressive, and girls have evolved to be more intelligent…

Follow-up to this: the guy I was having the discussion with simply doesn’t agree that social conditioning plays a part in behaviour (wrt participation or behaviour in sports).  The general consensus of him and the other dudebros in the forum is that nature programmes us.

The discussion included both the gender thing and was nibbling around the edges of LBGT* participation in archery.  The forum didn’t get too deep into it but someone posted a link to a study done in England which suggested that lesbian and bisexual women have a higher participation in sports than “all women”; gay men also participated more than “all men”.https://www.sportengland.org/research/encouraging-take-up/key-influences/sexual-orientation/

In my part of the world archery is very much a white, male sport; as for LBGT* participation I couldn’t really say.  My gaydar is pretty crap at the best of times.

Right now I’m having a discussion with someone on a forum who’s arguing that girls’ tendency to “hold back” in sports and in things like PE in High School is due to evolution, because boys have testosterone and have evolved to be stupid and aggressive, and girls have evolved to be more intelligent and protect themselves.

I’m arguing social conditioning (although of course you can’t completely ignore testosterone) which teaches children acceptable ways to behave and interact - for example little boys being rewarded with praise for playing roughly because they’re a “good little rugby player” so are much more likely to repeat the behaviour. Girls do not usually receive the same sort of feedback for this behaviour - they might be ignored or discouraged.

Also mentioned the “throw like a girl” videos.

Anything else I can use to back up my argument?

(wider context: gender imbalance in archery)

Previous attempts: 558, 551.

*Last month* of the winter postal. 18m all winter, and I thought that I wouldn’t get sick of it, but even alternating this and a longer distance didn’t really keep me interested.  Plus this round just seems to defeat me - it’s shot on a 60cm face.  Big, big face. 

So here I had a 3cm ring (this round uses the inner x-ring as a 10 for compound) to hit to get a 10, compared to a 2cm ring to hit to get a 10 on the smaller 40cm face. Today I got 26 10s, and my best ever WA 18m I got 23, so for some reason I’m just not performing as well with this particular round as I could.

But: it’s a 7-point bump over the first time I shot this (on Thursday, 558). And it’ll do.  It’ll do because I want to get outside and shoot long distances.  Well longish, since the first tourney I have in a month is a Canadian 900 and a Burton - 55m max.

On Thursday I did try an open stance for the first time (I usually shoot dead square) and I used the open yesterday too.  Today I went back to square.  So now I’m wondering whether to give the new technique a decent try, or not…

New outdoor season, new wraps & fletchings.

Wraps from custommadewraps.com, orange Vanetec shield vanes, and Easton G pin nocks. Probably orange for home and blue if I need an alternate.

Just bored of the white on white. Time for a change. Plus these wraps have my name and arrow number printed on, so no more label maker labels.

Only one more indoor shoot, or maybe two.  Three at the most.   then we’re into summer…

I don’t actually NEED anything.  My gear is fine and I’m quite happy not buying a new set of arrows until I’ve reached a particular score in the WA1440.  But I’m getting a little bored with the white-on white arrow colour scheme (white Easton Tite Flites on plain white wraps with orange nocks).

So in lieu of shiny new arrows, I finally bought a set of Custom Made Arrow Wraps and ordered a new bag of fletchings - Vanetec shield vanes, in *bright* orange.  It’ll look a little bit like this, except different:

Other stuff: I’ve been trying to figure out how to quiet down my bow.  It’s not very loud or badly noisy but I’d just like to dampen it down.  It has Airshox so no need to add limb savers, so I could get something like a BowJax riser or stabiliser damper, or just attach something to the rear mounting hole, like a regular damper & weight (this is what I’ve done as an experiment as I had an old recurve damer & a few weights in my box of old crap).  Looks a bit silly but we’ll see if it makes any difference at all.

Still fiddling round with weights to see if the “lift” on release can be tamed.  Putting more on the front - even a little bit more - made it too draggy.  So I took off a 1oz weight from the back and replaced if with two 1/3oz weights.  Still lifting, so tomorrow I’ll take off another of the 1/3 oz.

Lastly: given up the finger sling for the meantime in favour of a bowsling.  I don’t really need either - I don’t grip but my evenly weighted rig doesn’t drop or tip.  The sling will catch it if something does go wrong, and it’s faster to get on and off than the finger sling.

Roll on summer…

wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.
(Dead Poets Society, 1989)
wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.
(Dead Poets Society, 1989)
wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.
(Dead Poets Society, 1989)
wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.
(Dead Poets Society, 1989)
wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.
(Dead Poets Society, 1989)
wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.
(Dead Poets Society, 1989)
wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.
(Dead Poets Society, 1989)
wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.
(Dead Poets Society, 1989)
wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.
(Dead Poets Society, 1989)
wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.
We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.
(Dead Poets Society, 1989)

wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.

We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.

(Dead Poets Society, 1989)

@trinibob-151 said: What site setup are you using?
I use a Sure-Loc Challenger 550 extended nearly all the way out with a Shibuya 29mm scope and (I think) 8x lens which has a *big* open ring sticker.  I don’t like a dot - too fussy.
At the back end I use an Arc Systeme peep kit with interchangable apertures and for indoors a plain open peep.  It’s pretty big but I’m not sure of the size - it’s bigger than I’d like but the light isn’t great at our indoor facility so I need the bigger size to see my bubble clearly.  Outdoors I use a smaller peep with a clarifier. @trinibob-151 said: What site setup are you using?
I use a Sure-Loc Challenger 550 extended nearly all the way out with a Shibuya 29mm scope and (I think) 8x lens which has a *big* open ring sticker.  I don’t like a dot - too fussy.
At the back end I use an Arc Systeme peep kit with interchangable apertures and for indoors a plain open peep.  It’s pretty big but I’m not sure of the size - it’s bigger than I’d like but the light isn’t great at our indoor facility so I need the bigger size to see my bubble clearly.  Outdoors I use a smaller peep with a clarifier.

@trinibob-151 said: What site setup are you using?

I use a Sure-Loc Challenger 550 extended nearly all the way out with a Shibuya 29mm scope and (I think) 8x lens which has a *big* open ring sticker.  I don’t like a dot - too fussy.

At the back end I use an Arc Systeme peep kit with interchangable apertures and for indoors a plain open peep.  It’s pretty big but I’m not sure of the size - it’s bigger than I’d like but the light isn’t great at our indoor facility so I need the bigger size to see my bubble clearly.  Outdoors I use a smaller peep with a clarifier.

One perfect end at 18m.

Day 2 of tourney. Season goal of reaching 560: complete. Improvement of 5 points from my previous (practice) PB. Won my section.

Things I learned today:

  • I can improve after a shaky start.
  • I can shoot a couple of 8s and still get a PB. An 8 is not a disaster.
  • I have to set my bow-arm elbow correctly after I raise the bow but before I draw (not try and correct it after I draw).
  • Touching the front of the grip with my first two fingers is working out to be a good barometer of bow-hand position.

And now: food, couch, and nap.

Day 1 of tourney. Happy with the scores but really want to work on the flyer-8s (4 in each round).

Tired.

QuestionCompound bows are allowed in commonwealth games and if your a paraplegic in the Paralympics so it's not all bad! I know a junior compound girl who is on the England elite junior squad :) they compete all over the world ^.^ Answer

theloveofarchery:

I wasn’t trying to say that you can’t compete with compounds, I promise! I’m a recurve and compound shooter, but I’ve mainly competed with my compound. 

If only there was more archery at the Commonwealth Games!

As an optional sport it was included in Delhi, apparently because they got a bunch of cash to include it (2010), but wasn’t in Glasgow (this year) and isn’t on the cards for Gold Coast (2018) either.  The recurve and compound events were fantastic at Delhi so I’m hoping whoever gets the CWG in 2022 pushes for archery. 

I can’t see Compound being at the Olympics anytime soon :(

</rant>

The Stan family: JustX, Mag Micro, SX2.

Plan for Sunday:  shoot 90 arrows at a short distance to work on my shot execution.  30 arrows with my thumb release, 30 with my new back-tension and 30 more with the thumb.

I put some small faces up at 15m to have something to aim at, but I’m really bad at mentally keeping track of how I’m doing. Never really got the hang of blank bale shooting. At the very least, I didn’t score.

The first 30 were a bit of a struggle: I was getting distracted by the light glaring in my peep and finding it hard to relax.  Switched to the new back-tension - first one didn’t go so well because I had such a huge deep death-grip on the thing. A few goes drawing, releasing and letting down and I began to feel more comfortable with it - you can hold it at a 90deg angle to the loop without it going off.

Tried a couple of back-tension techniques I’ve been reading up on.  One is to relax the index finger; the other was something I noticed Braden Gellenthien doing - he seems to draw with three, and then hook his pinky around and put tension on that.  Out of these two techniques the second seemed to work better for me, but both felt too micro movement/fiddly.  I tried instead to just pull my elbow around which theoretically should rotate the release in the right direction, and this worked better.  I got some nice shots in before I switched back to the thumb release.  Last time I shot a back tension I just used to “pull” without really understanding what I wqas doing or why it was going off.  I’m approaching it this time with a bit more awareness of what I’m doing.

Last 30 with the thumb were pretty nice.  Noticed: bow hand grip.  Super important for me at the moment.  If I keep my index knuckle fairly high and my first and second fingers on the front of the grip, I get the cleanest release.  Bow is still popping up slightly, but this is the best balance I can get without feeling like I’m being dragged down at the front.

Plan for the week: Monday and Tuesday off. Wednesday: practice indoors.  I haven’t decided whether I’ll shoot a round or train, but I think the smart money is on training and focussing on the bow hand position.  Weekend: Tournament, triple FITA 18m over two days.

Sloppy and inconsistent.

The bad: Chased things around a lot and was generally disappointed in everything, given it’s shot on a 122cm face. Couldn’t really get into a good groove. Crappy groups.

The good: it’s the first time I’ve shot it, so automatic PB. The 60m distance was within a couple of points of the 60m distance in the last full FITA I shot back in March, if I convert a 5-end score into a 6-end score. Plus it was good fitness/stamina work as it’s been a while since I’ve shot a 90-arrow round.

Break-down:
60m: 271
50m: 272
40m: 278

Also: don’t really like the larger peep outdoors. Next time I’ll put the smaller sized one with the clarifier back in.

Tomorrow: play with my new release!